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Rented Housing available in Home Field Close

A tenant is moving out of one of the two bedroom houses at COMPTON DUNDON during the next few weeks. If you know of any families who are in need of local rented accommodation they should be advised to contact the South Somerset District Council

This property will be let through the local authority Choice Based Lettings scheme, and the advertisement is due to appear on the website on Wednesday 29 November 2017.

https://www.southsomerset.gov.uk/…/hou…/homefinder-somerset/

Joanne Howe| Regional Administrator| Hastoe Group
Tel: 01305 216930| Mobile: | Fax: 020 8943 2163 | Email: jhowe@hastoe.com|

Home Field Close       https://www.homefindersomerset.co.uk/Property/50030

https://www.homefindersomerset.co.uk/

 

COMPTON DUNDON PARISH COUNCIL – CLERK  Appointment

COMPTON DUNDON PARISH COUNCIL – CLERK  Appointment

After several years sterling service to the parish sadly our clerk

Stanislaw Berkieta has had to move out of the area.

The Council has appointed a new Parish Clerk and Responsible Financial Officer (RFO).

Our new clerk is Helen Richardson who has several years’ experience as a Parish Clerk

as well as managing corporate hospitality for sporting clubs.

The CDPC Clerk can still be contacted by email at : comptondundonclerk@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women’s Institute – Aug 17

This experimental meeting, held in August, was well attended, please note because of this trial, there will be no meeting in September. There will be an outing to the Rope Works at Isle Brewer, followed by lunch at the Smokery Hambridge on 13 September.

Our Speaker, Anne Goold introduced us to her miniature world bringing with her an extensive display of dolls houses in various settings, shops, spectacular examples of knitted dolls’ clothes tiny dolls’ cradles holding even tinier babies.

Anne explained that being Yorkshire born and bred, she had been brought up to make “summat out of nought”. Money was short in the 1940’s, her mother, a milliner taught her many skills. Born to be practical but also very artistic, Anne trained to be a draughtswoman, with an ONC in electrical engineering, found herself designing tractors.

Her next career change was to become a Youth and Community worker, her particular interest was with special needs clients.

After retirement, Anne wanted a hobby and seeing an advertisement in Weymouth for a Dolls’ House Group, her husband persuaded her to join what turned out to be South Dorset Miniatures. Anne apologised that she was unable to bring her large range of dolls’ houses to show us, many of these houses have been donated by W I ladies who have proved to be a great support to her especially supplying her with materials etc to make the contents of the houses. Anne will retire as a Speaker in November after 4 years.

When renovated Anne donates the houses to residential care homes, having furnished them in the style of the 1940’s, it proves to be a memory stimulant for the residents.

Anne teaches at classes, again concentrating on clients with special needs, so keeps things as simple as possible.

Materials used include the insides of toilet rolls, which are sterilised by placing in the microwave, something new is learned every day.Simply cut to look like a chair, upholstered with material attached with essential P V A glue, the result was amazing.

Other objects are made using any form of cardboard, cocktail sticks, makes a realistic clothes airer, lollipop sticks and wooden coffee stirrers and you have a sledge. Coconut fibre makes realistic sweeping brooms, this material is also used for thatching roofs . And so it went on, polymer clay to make sweets, vegetables, little figurines, this is therapeutic as it involves rolling and cooking.l Anne uses every medium except metal or glass.

Outstanding in her display was the clothes Anne knits, using sizes 19’s 20’s and 21’s, 1 ply wool or crochet cotton. These garments were exquisite, in all styles and fashions. One pair of knickers, complete with elastic was no bigger than my little finger nail, and was fitted on a tiny doll! It is difficult to cover everything we saw and heard but it was a fascinating experience. Christina Napper thanked Anne, mentioning the Craft

Christina Napper thanked Anne mentioning our own Craft Club saying the members will be inspired to try the new ideas.

The competition for a miniature object was won by Sue Hibberd with a collection of vehicles, Angie Castle with a crocheted handbag second and Janet Davies third with a wooden mushroom.

The flower of the month was won by Pat Maddaford with a rose.

A Quiz Night recently held at the Castlebrook Inn was very successful, thankyou to the Quiz Master, Robin.

The correspondence included a thankyou from Bucklers Mead W I for our recent hospitality, we will visit them October 10 when the subject for the Speaker will be My Life on a Fairground.

Dates to Remember:
September 29 Polden Hills Group Meeting at Puriton 7.30 p m December 6 Christmas Dinner, venue to be arranged.

October meting, Speaker Tony Bagwell, Nine Thankful Villages

Competition, Wartime Memorabilia.

Wendy Edwards

WI Report – July 2017

Someone once famously said “life is too short to stuff a mushroom” but is it too short to crystallise a flower? Apparently not because our Speaker, Jill Fade kept us enthralled with her entertaining, instructional talk on this very subject. Jill runs her own cottage industry, selling crystallised flowers on her website. Previously working in London as a television production manager, realising she did not wish to raise her family in London, Jill and her husband relocated to a derelict farmhouse in Devon.Someone had to work the decision was taken that whoever secured the first employment would work, the other to be at home with the children.Jill worked as a Training Officer for Devon County Council.  A friend in the T V world at Bristol contacted her to come back to T V, working on a programme “999”. This lasted for ten years when suddenly the work and extensive travelling took its toll and Jill became seriously ill, undertaking major surgery.No more work were the stern words of her doctor, but Jill could not sit at home being idle. This was an era when suddenly up market chefs started to use fresh flowers in their dishes. Jill decided to grow flowers, but not being sure which plants were edible  did her research  and found crystallised flowers. Jill read the method of how to do it and decided to give it a try. After four months the penny suddenly dropped and Jill had success. Jill warned that there is a definite knack to it, you will get sticky but everyone can crystallise a flower. You need egg white ( very lightly whipped) a paint brush, caster sugar ( not the golden one) and very fresh flowers. These are best picked directly from the garden, do not use flowers from florists or supermarkets as these may have been sprayed.If unsure about any flowers, play it safe and do not use them. Reliable sources of information are the internet and seed wholesalers. Not all edible flowers will crystallise, good ones include violas, honeysuckle, cornflowers, daisies and any herb flowers.  Very poisonous are sweet peas, azaleas, buttercups, hellebores, foxgloves and wisteria amongst others.

The method is to take the lightly whipped egg white, with a paintbrush painstakingly brush on to each individual petal, with a spoon shake caster sugar all over the petals, place on greaseproof paper and leave to dry, this can take up to two days.

Place into boxes ready for despatch to customers. Do not keep for more than two weeks, remember raw egg white is one of the ingredients. Jill competently demonstrated this method to us and the results were wonderful. Photographs of finished displays were shown and we realised how many flowers were used on wedding cakes etc. One of Jill’s greatest successes was to have some plain chocolate Easter eggs made and these she decorated with crystallised flowers, an instant sell out as people were reminded that this is how Easter eggs used to be.

Jill was the most entertaining and enthusiastic speaker and she was warmly thanked by Claire Axten.

Our visitors included seven members of Bucklers Mead W I, Sharon, and we were delighted to welcome back Doreen Smith who has been in hospital recently.

Dates to remember:  21 July    Quiz at Castlebrook Inn 7.30

10 August Coffee at Coxley Village Hall, a thankyou to everyone who contributed cakes or helped at the Bath and West Show.

10 October Visit to Bucklers Mead W I

The correspondence included a notification that we should have received log in details for My W I Website. ACWW celebrating 40th anniversary appeals have raised £150,000 and reports are available as to how the money has been raised.

Entry forms were available for the forthcoming Flower Show the W I Shield competition is for three cheese scones.

As as experiment, we are holding a meeting in August when the speaker will be Anne Gould, Miniatures in Dolls’ House, competition a miniature object. Consequently there will be no meeting in September, on 13 September there will be an outing to a Rope Making Centre followed by lunch at The Smokery at Hambridge.

The competition for an arrangement in an egg cup was won by Pat Maddaford and unusually we had first second and third prizes in the flower of the month competition, these being Mary Burt with a most unusual dahlia, Joan Carbin with antirrhinum and Trish Cox with sweet peas.

The drama group entertained us with their very special rendition of Cinderella and a varied finger buffet rounded off an extended but interesting evening.

Wendy Edwards.