WI Report – January 2018

Our Speaker for the first meeting of 2018 was Karen Burge whose subject was Detoxing and Exercise.

Karen is very passionate about her subject and explained in great detail how important it is to regularly detox our bodies of impurities.

Karen is not a great believer in dieting in order to achieve weight loss as she feels the underlying causes of being overweight are much more complicated and need to be dealt with in very different ways. If consulted, Karen offers help in managing stress, mental health problems and digestive disorders.

Apart from eating the wrong foods, toxins can be taken into the body by other means and Karen stressed we must be very careful just what products we put on our skin. As we all know, one of the most important and simple things we can do is to drink lots of water.

Karen gave us a great deal to think about and she was thanked by Angela.

Subscriptions were due this month, Trish announced she was to run her Savings Club again this year and Pat presented the Financial Statement

Angela explained that although Tony Warren had printed and produced an excellent programme for our forthcoming year, Tony was not completely happy with the quality and hence made no charge, this is very generous, thankyou Tony.

Angela announced two outings

1. A performance of The Vicar of Dibley at the Octagon Yeovil

2. 12 April A visit to the racing establishment of Andrew Balding followed by a trip to Highclere Castle (Downton Abbey).

Scrabble evenings will start again and several members expressed an interest in taking part in a Kurling Competition hosted by Walton W I on Friday February 16 at Walton Village Hall.

The competition for an action photograph was won by Janet Davies     second

Denise Larson and third Pat Maddaford. Trish Cox presented the winning flower of the month with a bright and cheery marigold.

Next month’s Speaker is Lucy Harper, subject  Moringa Oleifera, the competition Something Heartshaped. It is to be hoped that more members will be able to attend if the weather improves and the flu bugs are avoided.

Wendy Edwards.

WI Report – Dec 17

Only 17 members braved the elements on Wednesday evening, which was a shame as Kay Wych, accompanied by her husband, Bill, kept us well entertained with her account of how she became a 16th century kitchen maid.

Born and bred in Glastonbury, in sight of the Tor, Kay’s early career was at a local factory working in the office, having been brought up to the sound of typewriters clacking as her grandmother with whom she lived, was a teacher of shorthand and typing. Quickly realising that her colleagues spoke the Queens English whereas Kay had a distinct Somerset accent (nothing wrong with that) Kay decided to improve her diction and joined a drama class.

Glastonbury Arts Club set her on her way, appearing in plays at Strode Theatre, and open air theatre in the grounds of Glastonbury Abbey. Kay said think of life’s events being governed by three seeds. The first seed Kay put in the pot was taking part in drama The second was to study history, particularly of the local area.The third seed was archaeology.

Slowly, as she talked, Kay transformed herself into a 16th century maid, donning the appropriate clothes. Adopting the name of Alyce, she wore only blue or ochre as, at that time, only the rich were allowed to wear red, The material would be wool or linen. Fleas were commonplace and little bonnets were known as “nit caps”.

Alyce made things to sell, a salve for the “piles”made from lesser celandine roots.

Gradually the story emerged of the dissolution of the monasteries and the effect this had on people such as Alyce. Kay was joined by Bill, appropriately dressed as the King’s Officer, who confirmed the arrest of Bishop Whiting, who was subsequently hung, drawn and quartered.

Angela thanked Kay, adding that the wearing of the costumes had added to the authenticity of the telling of the events in the past..

December 6th saw a very good attendance at the annual Christmas Dinner, held this year at the Castlebrook Inn. The warmth of the welcome from the landlord and his wife, was matched by the excellence of the service and the food. A first class evening, a big Thankyou to Val Day and Trish for the organising and to the Castlebrook staff.

December 4th we took part in the Group Christmas Concert held at Westonzoyland Church. Anthea had put together an interpretation of the origin of the words of the popular carol Oh Little Town of  Bethlehem, an English and an American version. We have since received an accolade from Mo Retford County Music and  Drama firstly thanking Anthea for playing the organ for the general carols and secondly telling us that our presentation was exactly what she had been looking for, we are delighted.

Several members attended the annual carol service at Wells Cathedral.

Correspondence included an invitation from Liz Brown of Walton W I to a Kurling competition, Walton Village Hall, February 16 teams of 4, £10 per  team, supporters welcome at £2 each. We hope to field two teams.

Polden Hills Business Meeting, January 15 Woolavington Village Hall 7.30p m.

Frances reminded members of the next concert at the Meadway 17 February featuring the Church Fitters.

After all this we were more than ready for our Bucks Fizz, orange juice and mince pies.The raffle for the Christmas Hampers was won by Angela Castle, second Kay Wych, third Sheila Taylor, with the fourth prize a picture of Somerset Landscape won by Janet Davies.

Presentation of Awards.

W I Shield for Cookery at the Flower Show…Julie Gordon.

Cup for Flower of the Month Competition…Pat Maddaford.

Cup for Monthly Competition …Pat Maddaford.

The competition for a Frilly Apron was won by Pat Maddaford who also won The Flower of the Month with a rose.

Wendy Edwards.

Link

Rented Housing available in Home Field Close

A tenant is moving out of one of the two bedroom houses at COMPTON DUNDON during the next few weeks. If you know of any families who are in need of local rented accommodation they should be advised to contact the South Somerset District Council

This property will be let through the local authority Choice Based Lettings scheme, and the advertisement is due to appear on the website on Wednesday 29 November 2017.

https://www.southsomerset.gov.uk/…/hou…/homefinder-somerset/

Joanne Howe| Regional Administrator| Hastoe Group
Tel: 01305 216930| Mobile: | Fax: 020 8943 2163 | Email: jhowe@hastoe.com|

Home Field Close       https://www.homefindersomerset.co.uk/Property/50030

https://www.homefindersomerset.co.uk/

 

COMPTON DUNDON PARISH COUNCIL – CLERK  Appointment

COMPTON DUNDON PARISH COUNCIL – CLERK  Appointment

After several years sterling service to the parish sadly our clerk

Stanislaw Berkieta has had to move out of the area.

The Council has appointed a new Parish Clerk and Responsible Financial Officer (RFO).

Our new clerk is Helen Richardson who has several years’ experience as a Parish Clerk

as well as managing corporate hospitality for sporting clubs.

The CDPC Clerk can still be contacted by email at : comptondundonclerk@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WI Report – November 2017

Rachel Harding, our Speaker kept us fascinated with her Rhinestones and Sequins, Memoirs of A Competitive Ballroom Dancer. Her mother always taught her that self praise is no praise at all and Rachel has tried to adopt this motto throughout her dancing career.Starting at a social evening in their local village where Rachel danced quite happily whilst her husband sat in the corner, refusing to take to the floor. One very persuasive lady however would not leave him alone and he was finally dragged on to  the dance floor. At the end of the evening, his face was matching the colour of his tie – bright red.

On the journey home he vowed never again to be so humiliated and announced he was to learn to dance . Not quite believing what she was hearing, Rachel enrolled at their local dance school where they began with the traditional 1 2 3,1 2 3, which they practised over and over again, with the furniture pushed out of the way, at home.This was followed by the next lessons, 4 5 6, 4 5 6, again practised over and over again. Suddenly their teacher told them she felt they were ready for bigger and better things. Rachel and her partner ( as her husband was now known)  moved to an Advanced Class where, mesmerised, they were able to pick out some of the steps.Subsequently they were ready for a medal class.

Ordinary shoes are no good at all for competitive dancing, special shoes were purchased and Rachel began to make her dance dresses, her other love in life is sewing.Her partner was to wear a matching waistcoat to her dress, again her needle came in useful.

Progressing through the various stages, dresses became more elaborate and her partner had his dance jacket especially tailor made.

Rachel and her partner excelled at Latin dancing but the ballroom techniques were more difficult.This latter problem was solved when they were introduced to Peter Elliott, an ex World Champion. He gave lessons at Newbury, so much closer to home than London.Under his tutorage everything improved and they went from strength in ballroom dancing.

An extra section in the ballroom dancing competition at Gloucester was for Lady Elegant in which the dress, charisma and personality is judged as well as the dancing. Rachel, still making her own dresses, and what wonderful dresses they were, won right through to a 5th stage but, as they were by now dancing all over the world, this competition clashed with a dancing date in Germany which was judged to be more beneficial.

The Latin dancing had stagnated but its revival was  brought about by tutoring by Tony Goodyear of Bath, also an ex World Champion. Meeting  many famous people, amongst them Len Goodman who remarked on their charisma and confidence.The basic principles for both techniques are similar.

During the 14 years of active competitive dancing, Rachel and her husband ran their own business, managed a large house and garden  and raised two children, who incidentally took no interest in dance  but scoffed at their parents “prancing about”.

Rachel  brought one of her beautiful dresses for us  to examine and admire, plus lots of photographs of their dancing career.

Answering questions which were lively and varied, Rachel said her favourite Latin dances were Jive and Rumba and ballroom, the Foxtrot.

Frances thanked Rachel, saying how much she envied her life of dance, Frances would love to do the same but had married a non dancer.

Business meeting.

A very successful trip was made to Thatchers Cider Factory followed by a delicious lunch at the adjoining Railway Inn.Angela was thanked for her organisation of this trip.

A thankyou letter was received from Anthea for flowers and card received following her recent operation, we were pleased Anthea was able to attend the meeting. Pat Maddaford presented the Financial Statement showing a healthy balance.

Dates to Remember.

November 10 Drama Rehearsal at Mary Burt’s 4p m November 21 Craft Club at the Hall, 9.30 -12.

November 22 Scrabble at Julie Gordon’s 6.45p m December 4 Group Christmas Concert at Westonzoyland December 6 Christmas Meal Castlebrook Inn 7 for 7.30p m December 13 Christmas Party at Meadway Hall, Speaker, Kay Wych, Maid at Glastonbury Abbey.Mince pies, tea and coffee, Secret Santa, wrapped gifts to the value of £5.Raffle for two luxury hampers.

The competition for an evening bag was won by Christina Napper with Pat Maddaford and Angela Castle second and third. The Flower of the  Month, winner Pat Maddaford with begonias.

Wendy Edwards.

Women’s Institute – Aug 17

This experimental meeting, held in August, was well attended, please note because of this trial, there will be no meeting in September. There will be an outing to the Rope Works at Isle Brewer, followed by lunch at the Smokery Hambridge on 13 September.

Our Speaker, Anne Goold introduced us to her miniature world bringing with her an extensive display of dolls houses in various settings, shops, spectacular examples of knitted dolls’ clothes tiny dolls’ cradles holding even tinier babies.

Anne explained that being Yorkshire born and bred, she had been brought up to make “summat out of nought”. Money was short in the 1940’s, her mother, a milliner taught her many skills. Born to be practical but also very artistic, Anne trained to be a draughtswoman, with an ONC in electrical engineering, found herself designing tractors.

Her next career change was to become a Youth and Community worker, her particular interest was with special needs clients.

After retirement, Anne wanted a hobby and seeing an advertisement in Weymouth for a Dolls’ House Group, her husband persuaded her to join what turned out to be South Dorset Miniatures. Anne apologised that she was unable to bring her large range of dolls’ houses to show us, many of these houses have been donated by W I ladies who have proved to be a great support to her especially supplying her with materials etc to make the contents of the houses. Anne will retire as a Speaker in November after 4 years.

When renovated Anne donates the houses to residential care homes, having furnished them in the style of the 1940’s, it proves to be a memory stimulant for the residents.

Anne teaches at classes, again concentrating on clients with special needs, so keeps things as simple as possible.

Materials used include the insides of toilet rolls, which are sterilised by placing in the microwave, something new is learned every day.Simply cut to look like a chair, upholstered with material attached with essential P V A glue, the result was amazing.

Other objects are made using any form of cardboard, cocktail sticks, makes a realistic clothes airer, lollipop sticks and wooden coffee stirrers and you have a sledge. Coconut fibre makes realistic sweeping brooms, this material is also used for thatching roofs . And so it went on, polymer clay to make sweets, vegetables, little figurines, this is therapeutic as it involves rolling and cooking.l Anne uses every medium except metal or glass.

Outstanding in her display was the clothes Anne knits, using sizes 19’s 20’s and 21’s, 1 ply wool or crochet cotton. These garments were exquisite, in all styles and fashions. One pair of knickers, complete with elastic was no bigger than my little finger nail, and was fitted on a tiny doll! It is difficult to cover everything we saw and heard but it was a fascinating experience. Christina Napper thanked Anne, mentioning the Craft

Christina Napper thanked Anne mentioning our own Craft Club saying the members will be inspired to try the new ideas.

The competition for a miniature object was won by Sue Hibberd with a collection of vehicles, Angie Castle with a crocheted handbag second and Janet Davies third with a wooden mushroom.

The flower of the month was won by Pat Maddaford with a rose.

A Quiz Night recently held at the Castlebrook Inn was very successful, thankyou to the Quiz Master, Robin.

The correspondence included a thankyou from Bucklers Mead W I for our recent hospitality, we will visit them October 10 when the subject for the Speaker will be My Life on a Fairground.

Dates to Remember:
September 29 Polden Hills Group Meeting at Puriton 7.30 p m December 6 Christmas Dinner, venue to be arranged.

October meting, Speaker Tony Bagwell, Nine Thankful Villages

Competition, Wartime Memorabilia.

Wendy Edwards